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Someday my Prince will come, Not. Breaking the Chain.

I don’t remember the years between 5 and 9/10 years old but afterwards I suffered major hairloss and wrote a song called ‘Amnesiac’. Other than the memories below the only other memories potentially between this time are of pain such as falling on glass, concussions, falling off a bike, swallowing paint, head getting stuck in a bannister, being locked outside, hiding for hours, burning hand, broken arm, being beaten in the back with a stiletto shoe, a steel ruler etc. Most of them I remember as accidents.

Then there was house I used to stay at every weekend, she was formerly a neighbour and had moved quite a distance but came to collect me anyway. The last time I stayed there she had friends over, it turned into a party and all I remember is hitting something behind me (probably furniture) as I slumped into unconsciousness and saw her friends laughing at me like hyenas. Shortly after at school every one in my year had to be ‘checked’, we each individually went into one of the assembly halls and our parent(s)/guardian(s) waited outside. In the hall were a group of adults seated at tables and we had to strip down to our underwear and present ourselves as well as pull our underwear down a little. Apparently they were looking for signs of abuse and that there had been a report of domestic violence but one of people from the party was on the panel.

My earliest memory was at 5 years old, and according to child psychology that’s pretty late for children; I remember being in a car and seeing lights go past (night time) and my dad being there or a father figure. Apparently it was a family outing but I don’t remember anyone else there except him and I. We were going to see Cinderella (1950 Disney version) at the local cinema but it wasn’t re-released that year… I’ve always wondered what it meant and that if it was a type of story/fantasy programming why wasn’t it the usual Oz stories, Alice in Wonderland (had elements of that in my life) or the Narnia Chronicles.

Cinderalla and the ash ‘cinders’ girls stories in general are obviously based on kindness (including kindness to animals), subservience with gratitude/grace built in to those who are greedy and ruthless, punishment (for what?) and reward, and rising again like a phoenix to royalty (as if royalty is any better) but through marriage. (Thankfully I’ve gotten rid of the ‘lost partner’ complex as I wrote about HERE in many fairytale programmings.) This was later reinforced by the book ‘Pamela: Or Virtue Rewarded’ (1740) by Samuel Richardson – the story basically shows her gaining status and respect by marrying into a higher class to the man who tried to/did rape her. However in that story Pamela is a resilient character who stands her ground whereas Cinderella is portrayed as unquestioning (though not in the Grimm’s version, explained later).

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Excerpt from: http://www.vox.com/2015/3/15/8214405/cinderella-fairy-tale-history

Disney didn’t invent Cinderella. Her story is at least 2,000 years old.

Updated by Kelsey McKinneykelsey@vox.com Mar 15, 2015, 12:00pm EDT

There are two faces to Cinderella: there’s the European folk tale that evolved into the modern-day story of a girl in a big blue ball gown, and there’s the centuries-old plot that has been passed between cultures for millennia.

The story of overcoming oppression and marrying into another social class to be saved from a family that doesn’t love or appreciate you is an incredibly powerful one, too powerful to be contained by the story we all know. At the center of most Cinderella stories (whether they use that name for their protagonist or not) is one thing: a persecuted heroine who rises above her social station through marriage.

The first recorded story featuring a Cinderella-like figure dates to Greece in the sixth century BCE. In that ancient story, a Greek courtesan named Rhodopis has one of her shoes stolen by an eagle, who flies it all the way across the Mediterranean and drops it in the lap of an Egyptian king.

Taking the shoe drop as a sign from the heavens (literally and metaphorically), the king goes on a quest to find the owner of the shoe. When he finds Rhodopis, he marries her, lifting her from her lowly status to the throne.

Another one of the earliest known Cinderella stories is the ninth-century Chinese fairy tale Ye Xian, in which a young girl named Ye Xian is granted one wish from some magical fishbones, which she uses to create a gown in the hopes of finding a husband.

Like Rhodopis’ tale, a monarch comes in possession of the shoe (this time, the shoes have a gold fish-scale pattern) and goes on a quest to find the woman whose tiny feet will fit the shoe. Ye Xian’s beauty convinces the king to marry her, and the mean stepmother is crushed by stones in her cave home.

The European version of the story originated in the 17th century

In total, more than 500 versions of the Cinderella story have been found just in Europe, and the Cinderella we know best comes from there (France, specifically).

The first version of Cinderella that bears a significant similarity to the most famous version emerged in the 17th century, when a story called Cenerentola was published in a collection of Italian short stories. Cenerentola has all the ingredients of the modern-day tale — the wicked stepmother and stepsisters, the magic, and the missing slipper — but it’s darker and just a bit more magical.

In the story, a woman named Zezolla escapes the king, who wants to marry her, at two separate celebrations — before he finally catches her at the third one and prevents her from leaving. Instead of a story of requited love, Cenerentola is a story of forced marriage and six very wicked stepsisters.

Sixty years later, the Italian tale got a French twist and became the story we know. In Cendrillon, Charles Perrault — a French writer credited with inventing the fairy tale — cast the form that Cinderella would take for the next 400 years. He introduced the glass slipper, the pumpkin, and the fairy godmother (minus the bibbidi bobbidi boo). This is the version Disney later adapted into its animated classic.

The Brothers Grimm had a, well, grimmer take on the tale

The Brothers Grimm also collected the tale in their famous fairy tale compendium. That story, called Aschenputtel (Cinderella in the English translations), appeared more than 100 years after Perrault’s version in the 19th century.

Aschenputtel is a much darker tale. Cinderella’s wishes come not from a fairy godmother but from a tree growing on her mother’s grave. Her father, instead of being absent as in Perrault’s tale, is willfully ignorant of his daughter’s suffering.

In the Grimm version, the heroine’s slippers are made of gold (not glass), and when the Prince comes to test the stepsisters’ feet for size, one of them cuts off her own toes to try and make the shoe fit [My comment: how very Chinese]. In the end, Cinderella marries the prince, her stepsisters serve as her bridesmaids, and doves peck their eyes out during the ceremony. It is, needless to say, a beautiful tale for children.

For more information on Asian versions of the story look here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinderella

Exerpt from: https://www.bustle.com/articles/61053-9-things-about-the-original-brothers-grimm-cinderella-story-that-are-nothing-like-the-disney-version

By JR Thorpe Jan 29 2015

9 Things About The Original Brothers Grimm Cinderella Story That Are Nothing Like The Disney Version

1. Cinderella is exactly the opposite of helpless.

Aschenputtel (remember, that’s Cinderella’s name in their version) doesn’t mope about. She sorts everything out herself, and considering that her pragmatism involves a magic tree, some enchanted birds, and the apparent ability to disappear, it seems that she isn’t actually an emotionally neglected kitchen maid, but a talented witch.

2. She is also seriously good at hiding.

The Grimm Brothers’ prince insists on accompanying his newfound love home, to see who the hell she is. (Twice, mind you, since there are actually three balls in the original story.) Aschenputtel has to hide in a pigeon coop and up a pear tree until he goes away. And she isn’t found. Good work.

3. The ‘fairy’ godmother is really just a tree growing on her dead mother’s grave.

The godmother’s not a fairy, or even a person. In Aschenputtel’s version, Cinderella’s father asks what he can get her on a business trip, and she asks for a simple twig (the stepsisters ask for gold and pearls, because they’re not maudlin hippies). She then plants it on her mother’s grave and waters it with her tears. Said tree grows up to give her whatever she wants: the dresses are just the latest incarnation. Aschenputtel is clearly powerful as hell, so why she wants to marry some dude who chases her into a pigeon coop is beyond me.

4. The stepmother has a peculiar obsession with lentils.

Aschenputtel’s stepmother throws first one, then two cups of lentils into the ash and tells Aschenputtel that if she can pull them all out, she can come to the ball. Aschenputtel manages it, which I will explain momentarily, but I still don’t know why she didn’t ask the tree to throw down a sword and just chase the lentil-hater around the garden. [My comment: reminds me of a Caribbean of African folktale about tricking a particular type of demoness by making her count rice and she has to finish before sunrise.]

5. “Fit into the shoe” actually means “cut off bits of your feet.”

None of this wimpy “my foot doesn’t fit” stuff for the Grimms. To fit her into the tiny golden slipper, one of her sisters cuts off her big toe, the other a bit of her heel. Their plans are foiled by the blood everywhere (which surely somebody must have thought about), but hey, points for trying.

6. Cinderella has some seriously badass birds as minions.

The birds are basically Aschenputtel’s soldiers: they pluck all of her lentils out of the ashes, eating the bad ones and putting all the good ones in the pot. But they’re not cheery little singing friends.

When her stepsisters cut off their body parts to fit into the slipper, the birds tell on them, by twice sitting in the Hazel Tree of Death and singing a peppy song to the prince about how the slipper of his stepsister-bride is filling with blood.

And then, once they’ve guaranteed their witchy mistress’s ascension to the throne via marriage, they find the stepsisters in the church and peck out their eyes. (More on that in a moment.)

7. The father has a strong destructive streak.

Aschenputtel’s dad’s not dead, as he was in the Disney film; instead he’s still around and being a nuisance. When the prince turns up at his door, not once but twice, with a story about a girl hiding in various bits of his property, he doesn’t call the police — he, wondering if the girl could be Aschenputtel, gets an axe and chops whatever it is down. Pigeon coop? Smashed. Beautiful pear tree filled with fruit? Kindling.

Let me remind you that he does this while thinking his daughter might be inside. She should have got her birds to make her a boat and floated the hell away from that madhouse.

8. The prince is a predator [my comment: and hunter] with a mysterious-princess-trap.

I have to give Aschenputtel’s prince credit for at least having a personality. Admittedly he does chase her into chicken coops, but he also, after the third ball, he lays a trap: he smears the palace steps with pitch so that she leaves her golden shoe behind. Smart man. (Though he then fails to notice said shoe filling with blood until some magic birds tell him.)

9. The stepsisters end up getting horribly blinded.

The Grimm stepsisters are truly awful, and get a truly awful comeuppance. You know how I said they were blinded? Here’s how that goes down: they want so badly to get the reflected glory of Aschenputtel’s royal wedding that they accompany her up the aisle, at which the birds peck one eye out. But they still want it so badly that they accompany her back down the aisle, and the birds promptly peck out the other eye. Respect.

I’ve just been refreshing my memory about jewel stones and colours in masonic training as well as the gems/colours for the tribes of Isreal (and astrology) when I found some interesting comparable parables in the bible:

http://timothyfish.blogspot.co.uk/2009/10/is-there-cinderella-story-in-bible.html

Wednesday, October 7, 2009

Is There a Cinderella Story in the Bible?

Someone came to this blog the other day looking for the answer to the question Is there a Cinderella story in the Bible? The answer to that is yes and no. It depends on exactly what aspects of the Cinderella story you are referring to. No, you won’t find a maiden with a fairy godmother who transforms her into a princess, but yes, there are some stories that have similarities to the Cinderella story.

Consider the life of Joseph. His father loved Joseph, but his step-brothers hated him. They hated him so much that they threw him in a pit and would have killed him had not he older brother suggested they sell him instead. He was taken to Egypt and sold as a slave and eventually ended up in prison. But he had the gift of prophesy and he foretold of a great famine. The king was so convinced by Joseph that he put him in charge of preparing the land for a long period with few crops, making him a rule of the land. Joseph’s brothers came when they needed food and bowed before him.

Or consider Ruth. After her husband died, she went with her mother-in-law to her mother-in-law’s home land. Being poor, she gathered grain the reapers left in the fields of a wealthy farmer. He fell for Ruth and told the reapers to leave more behind for her than they normally would have. There’s even a shoe involved in this story.

The story of Esther is that of a maiden who marries a king.

David has a Cinderella-like story. Of his brothers, he was considered the most unlikely person to become king, but upon the direction of God, Samuel anointed him to be the king who would replace Saul.

And what about every gentile who has ever been saved by the grace of God? We were no better than dogs, but we have been made kings and priests. So, is there a Cinderella story in the Bible? Absolutely.

http://www.preachology.com/cinderella-salvation.html

CINDERELLA SALVATION

by Charles Robey
(Trussville AL)

In Luke 15:1-7, we find Jesus telling the parable of the Lost Sheep. Jesus asks, “What man upon you would not leave ninety-nine sheep, in the open pasture, and go search for the one sheep that was lost?” Like the lost wearer of the Golden Slipper, Jesus emphasizes the lost state of man.

As the Kingdom Prince had faith that he would find eternal peace, by finding his new found love, through the perfect fit of the glass slipper, so also may mankind, by way of faith, have eternal peace through God’s redemptive power.

“For by grace you have been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; not as a result of works, that no one should boast.” (Ephesians 2:8-9)

I found this one particularly interesting: Bear in mind that El e.g. Elle or Ella or Ellie/y goes back to the Mother Goddess Lalita in ‘Hinduism’ but has become masculanized in the later Abrahamic religions.

http://www.parowanprophet.com/Great_Seal/cinderella.htm

Cinderalla, The Story of Redemption.

Cinderella -Who are you? John Bull
Where are you? March 2001 East
The story is Centuries old. Tribes # 3

Hosea 1:10 “Yet the number of the children of Israel shall be as the sand of the sea, which cannot be measured nor numbered; and it shall come to pass, that in the place where it was said unto them, (USA & world) Ye are not my people, there it shall be said unto them, Ye are the sons of the living God.” The Jews are no longer his people.

Matthew 21; 43 “Therefore say I unto you, (Jews) The kingdom of God shall be taken from you, and given to a nation bringing forth the fruits thereof.” (USA)

This will be about Cinderella, and who the Prince will choose. If you want to learn, then you will have to un-learn all of your traditions.
You go to College to learn. And to do well you have to study.

“Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.” 2 Timothy 2:15

Some people are: “Ever learning, and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth.”
2 Timothy 3:7

The ‘Signs’ are here now, and it is Midnight for Cinderella! And tomorrow God is really going to clean house. CLICK HERE to see the “Signs.”

You have been asleep just like the 10 virgins waiting for the bridegroom in Matthew Chapter 25 When the Prince comes will your foot fit into the slipper. Like Cinderella’s did?

Because you’re wise, now we will talk about Cinderella. (Don’t laugh because I said you are wise.

You are smart enough to read here, when others just scoff at me like 2 Peter 3:3 said would happen.)

There really is a Prince coming, (Matthew 25) and there will be a wedding, with the Bride of Christ. Some people think that the bride is the church, but they are asleep. The Prince of Peace (Isaiah 9:6) is coming for Israel. (Not the Jews, or the church, but true Israel!) CLICK HERE to learn of Israel.

As the story goes, Ella’s mother had died and her father had remarried a woman with two daughters, and then had to go away on a long journey. While he was gone, bad things happened.

Jesus spoke of it in Matthew 25:14-15, 28-34

Ella was treated as a servant girl in her own house. You will remember that Israel was the servant to Pharaoh in Egypt. She had to clean the fireplace and carry out all the ashes from the fires. They gave her the name that fit her “Cinder-Ella.” Because of the cinders in her hair and clothes.

Remember that before her father had left on his trip he asked what each person wanted him to bring back, as a gift for each of them.

The two stepdaughters asked for dresses, pearls, jewels. Ella asked for a ‘branch’ that she could plant to remember, and so honor her mother.

(“Zion” God even calls a city after her honor, the city of Zion. Just as we do naming Susanville, Marysvale, Virginia City, and a thousand other cities with women’s names in honor of them.

Even in our time “trees” are planted in the remembrance of people who have died.)

Ezekiel 31 speaks of ‘trees’ as people, and nations. And the ‘trees’ in Eden, or Eden people.

Isaiah 10: 12-20 speaks of the ‘fruit’ of the king of Assyria. And the axe and the saw,
and ‘trees’ of his forest shall be few. Eve got some bad, ‘fruit’ from the ‘tree’ in Eden.

The story of Cinderella portrays her plainly as the bride of Christ.

No other people than Israel who was cast off, and migrated into the North countries, as your European ancestors did sit by the fireplace to warm themselves and cook. Today we all like to cuddle up in front of a good fire. There we watch cinders go up the chimney.

Just like Ella did. And wait for Jesus Christ,

The Prince, The King, to come save us.

The expression comes from “Cinderella’s lost glass slipper.” Remember when she fled the grand ball, (dance) the Prince chased her and she lost her glass slipper. So why was it “glass”, instead of pretty red shoes that most women want.

The Prince searched the realm for the maiden whose foot fit into the “glass” slipper. The only foot that did fit was Cinderella. When she put it on, and the fit was perfect, she pulled the other “glass” slipper out of her pocket and put it on to have the matched pair on her feet.

Revelation tell us why they were “glass” slippers. Now can you get revelation about it?
I will quote it for you: “Revelation 4: 6 And before the throne there was a sea of “glass” like unto crystal: and in the midst of the throne, and round about the throne, were four beasts full of eyes before and behind. [My comment: the so-called ultimate ‘gods’ of post-Vedic Hinduism have been described and depicted as part of the throne of Lalita as they are nothing but workers (traitors) beneath her in hierarchy. The image is also used in Freemasonry:

Which is exactly how this writer describes the Wicked Stepmother and step-sisters; remember the Scarlet woman in never a good thing in the bible but it has been twisted from older cultures where they were priestesses (and not prostitutes).]

Cinderella’s all over the world wait for the Prince. Everyone will wear soot and ashes before the wedding.    You can read all about it on my other pages.    Nuclear War Comes.

Cinderella’s all over the world wait for the Prince. Everyone will wear soot and ashes before the wedding. You can read all about it on my other pages… There is a lot more to tell you about Cinderella in the future. If you can live to see, the morning come. Don’t be late, or be sorry. If the blind are leading you, then your headed for the ditch.

What about when the Prince is a masculanized version of the Princess/Daughter? Just as most of the male avatars have been.

Her glass slippers remind me of Dorothy’s original Silver slippers (also representing diamond, crystal, glass) turned Ruby Red (lesser class) for the film and obviously since I’ve learned that Cinderella’s were also Gold (Grimm’s version).

And why does Cinderella (like the book ‘Pamela: Or Virtue Rewarded’ (1740) by Samuel Richardson) always have to be accepted by a ‘prince’/’saviour’ figure. Reminds me of Julia Roberts and Richard Gere in ‘Pretty Woman’ (1990) where they show prostitutes are people too, are raped and need to be saved; and then together again they starred in ‘Runaway Bride’ (1999) about a woman who just can’t bring herself to get married until she meets a man determined enough to save/marry her.

I prefer the versions of Cinderella where she does the saving like in ‘Ever After: A Cinderella Story’ (1998) starring Drew Barrymore.
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NOT NO CINDERELLA ANYMORE

Since 2013 when we broke away from a masonic situation (e.g. a recruitment agent who would call me as soon as I got back from holiday leave abroad even though I wouldn’t tell her my flight times, but schedule going back to work a day or two after yet she’d still call me as soon as I got back to a UK airport) we were followed and re-conctact and reinforcement programming/gang stalking continued (e.g. the day after we moved into a new place there were footsteps all around the property in the snow, especially around the windows and up and down the garden alongside what looked like a the prints of a machine and a message on the window. No one else had any footprints around there properties and from the looks of the road the person(s) came straight to ours. There’s tons of incidents like that).

The book described below is 17 years old but many if the techniques are still the same, the information people are lacking is about Virtual Reality which is where this book ends. Everything else I knew in the book already, the author writes about these things happening to children but it can happen to adults too though it usually starts and can continue into adulthood. Most recently I’ve been particularly reminded of being made close to someone and them deliberately betraying you, expect you to forgive them, cause confusion and then want you to act as if nothing happened/even be dependent on them and taking credit if you manage to get through the experience.

https://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/breakingthechain/contents.htm

The author is spot on when they say it takes years of programming (and indeed times in a persons life where at the end of a cycle it needs to be renewed) and hence can take years of therapy with someone used to such situations to try to heal.

Next Post:
Feast of the Beast – Bride/Sacrifice of the beast, rescued.