Pursuing natural health & thinking beyond the superficial. Deconstructing Culture.

Posts tagged ‘Missing People’

Telling People to Stay Put, and Repeatedly, was Not the Right Answer

There’s a lot of information on missing people on this page but here’s a few quotes:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4610428/Artist-named-fourth-victim-Grenfell-Tower-blaze.html

Rania Ibrham: No contact after filming harrowing video from 23rd floor

Ms Ibrham also sent a heartbreaking Snapchat message to another friend at 2.45am in which she said in Arabic, ‘forgive me everyone, goodbye’. In the video Ms Ibrham, who is from Sudan, screams ‘Hello, hello, come here’ as she ignores the advice of a friend and family members to keep her door closed.

Residents are seen rushing through her door as they try to shelter from the smoke and flames of the inferno.

El-Wahabi family: Couple and three children who lived on 21st floor

The family all lived on the 21st floor of the tower, according to Mr Wahabi’s sister. Hanan Wahabi told reporters: ‘I rang him and the fire had not reached the top of the block at that point. He said he had been told to stay inside, stay in one room together and put towels under the door.

‘I told him to leave. He said he was going to come. Then I called him and he said there was too much smoke. The last time I saw him they were waving out the window. The last time I spoke to his wife, he was on the phone to the fire brigade.’

Housewife Amina Ahmed, 28, who lives on the 19th floor of next door tower block Winstable, knew the Moroccan family of five.

She said: ‘They were on the 21st floor of Grenfell and were told not to leave their flat when the fire started. Had they left at the time they would have got out alive.

‘I’m so heartbroken as I could see it and could hear families screaming. I felt so helpless. Our building is very similar so we are just terrified of it happening to us one day.’

Zainab and Jeremiah Dean: Told to stay in their 14th floor flat

Francis Dean said his sister Zainab told been told by firefighter to remain in her flat on the 14th floor along with her son Jeremiah, 2.

He told The Telegraph: ‘My sister called me to say there was a fire in the tower. I told her to leave by the stairs but she said she had been told to stay inside her flat. That was in the early hours of today and I’ve not heard from her since. I fear the worst.’

Mr Dean said that a firefighter used his phone to speak to his sister. ‘He told her to keep calm and that they were coming to get her,’ he said. ‘He kept saying that to her again and again.

‘But then he handed me the phone and said to me ‘Tell her you love her’. I knew then to fear the worst. The phone went dead and I couldn’t talk to her.’

Raymond ‘Moses’ Bernard who lived on the 21st floor

Friends of the popular Raymond ‘Moses’ Bernard, one of at least 70 people reported missing after the Grenfell Tower fire in London, say hopes of finding him alive are ebbing away as the days pass.

But on Wednesday night he decided to stay in his own flat on the top floor with the dog the couple shared, a King Charles spaniel named Marley. ‘There’s no way he would have left the dog,’ said Trish. ‘The dog was like their child.’

Grenfell Tower block fire in London Before and After Cladding

Daily Mail
File photo dated 05/05/11 of the Grenfell Tower in west London, where several people died after a huge fire destroyed the tower block with witnesses reporting residents trapped on upper floors as the flames tore rapidly up the building.

What was the point in the cladding at all, in wasting how much of the refurbishment budget on it? What was the point!?!? The people didn’t need that (let alone for it to burn to almost the top of the building 20 minutes), how many improvements the residents could have had instead… The old building minus the ugly prison looking cladding wouldn’t have burned like that.

And what is this:

Grenfell Tower Time Fire Took to Spread Infographic

Daily Mail

Why is there 21 floors in this infographic, 27 floors in the caption and reportedly 24 floors elsewhere in the news plus info from missing persons on 21+ floors in this article and other places. I keep seeing this discrepancy everywhere.

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All those people – if they hadn’t been told to stay put they’d have a much better chance of surviving, they could of gotten to lower floors where they could’ve been reached and/or taken in by others who were about to be rescued or even made it out the door. Along with that they could’ve grabbed their families, pets, friends, neighbours and money/essentials and gone. Always, always, always have a bag packed. Most people are not ready for emergencies and the only time they have an overnight bag packed is in pregnancy or with those who need constant care; tons of people have forgotten how to react in a power outage for crying out loud and don’t have any backup. Always have an overnight bag packed as if you were going camping and your valuables/medicine easy to get to. No one is going to that for you and in terms of retrieving items, that’s in the aftermath – if they survived. Don’t pack the kitchen sink just everything that is really important to you, you won’t be able to get back your parent’s/grandparent’s gift such as a necklace or photos that could you haunt you for years in regret because you forgot it. Just pack it away ready, if you use it put it back in your safety bag immediately afterwards. For everything else such as a torch, dried food, water canister, dry clothing, toilet paper etc keep a spare set in that bag. Don’t pack more than you can carry. Even if you’re single and don’t have to hold on to/support other people/animals you don’t know who/what you’ll meet on the way now how tough your route(s) is going to get. Time is of the essence and you have to use that time wisely – a few seconds and minutes can both seem like not enough and an eternity when you’re in an emergency/fight, sometimes it seems like slow motion and you can get a lot done in them especially if your rescuer is hours away and the threat moves faster and in this case a lot faster towards you.

Every emergency drill I’ve been in tells you to leave your items (bag, coat etc), leave everything (your work for example) and go but then you find people are rushing out pushing past and leaving pregnant women behind who have to make a much slower descent, older people, disabled people etc – only to be followed by co-ordinators/officials saying you should’ve waited and helped them too. D’uh. Common sense is hard in any situation let alone a life threatening one, I just wish we didn’t defer so much of our personal responsibility and freedom to others/’professionals’ who don’t always have our best interests at heart, are bogged down by protocol or who like are human and can’t always think straight even if/when they’re trained – so many of those people/animals in Grenfell Tower and other places all around the world all the time didn’t ‘need’ to die.

We shouldn’t have ‘examples’ like this to learn from, we should know and remember already.

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On another tangent, there’s something which has been bothering me at the back of my mind which I haven’t wanted to admit – but when I look at the names and photos of the dead and missing there’s one thing which keeps coming up (and something I wondered when initially hearing about this just because it tends to be a factor whether we like it or not, think its overhyped or not)… Most of the people shown so far are not White or not obviously so.

He brings up a lot of salient points; the race issue, the fact that if a regular person injured or killed someone they’d be brought up on it straight away but corporations and institutions aren’t it’s like they faceless and hard to pin down, desensitization to the ongoing wars, that we all live here together why are some people more prone to suffering than others e.g. through class/wealth etc.

Grenfell Tower Missing People

Grenfell Tower Missing People

Some of the Missing People and Contact Details for Assistance

I can see sentiment rising that a lot of the missing people are actually dead in the building and the information just not released but until official lists are given it’s best to keep an eye out:

Grenfell Tower Missing People

Grenfell Tower Missing People

And at the same time – people like this heartfelt sincere woman deserve to be heard and I agree with a lot of what she says, not all but still. Well done for saying what has to be said:

She’s right – 500 funerals need paying for. People need their lives rebuilt. I dont like Oxfam and really don’t like the Red Cross but I dont disagree with foreign aid and I think they do deserve as much help as we can give them but these donations are for these particular people. There are victims there and in the places open for them but she’s right – where are the rest of them? So many donations are rushing in that non-organizational based volunteers are being kept away from the frontlines. They’re frustrated and hurt. Put them to good use, they need to know they’re helping.

Urgent advice and support for victims, their friends and families

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/grenfell-tower-fire-june-2017-support-for-people-affected

Residents who are displaced due to the fire please call the Kensington and Chelsea Council housing line on 020 7361 3008.

The Westway Sports Centre, Crowthorne Road, W10 6RP, is now the Family and Friends Reception and is being staffed by the police.

Any family and friends concerned about their loved ones please contact the Casualty Bureau on 0800 0961 233.

If someone was reported as missing and has been found safe, please call the Casualty Bureau with an update.

The NHS encourages Londoners to use NHS services wisely and seek advice from NHS 111 in the first instance.

Benefit enquiry line

The Government has set up a dedicated benefit enquiry line for people affected by the fire at Grenfell Tower. The following numbers will be manned between 8am and 6.30pm, Monday to Friday:

020 7941 6661
020 7941 6634
020 7941 6671

Banks offering help

The banking industry is ready to help people who have lost their homes in the fire at Grenfell Tower who have also lost all access to their bank cards, accounts and ID documents. Banks have been contacting customers to provide assistance and arrange emergency access to funds.

Find out more information about what the banks are offering, with appropriate helpline numbers.

If you are a foreign national

Foreign nationals in the UK affected by this incident may wish to contact their embassy, high commission or consulate, which may also be able to provide information or assistance.

Pet support

Anyone affected by the fire in London and needing temporary accommodation for their dogs or cats please contact Battersea Dogs and Cats Home on 020 7627 9217.

If your pet needs treatment or fostering, Blue Cross animal hospitals could be able to help. Call 0300 777 1890 for Victoria (central London), 0300 777 1800 for Hammersmith (west London) or 0300 777 1810 for Merton (south London).

Physical injuries

Hospitals across London have been treating those injured. If you are experiencing or are concerned about physical problems, seek advice and help from one of the range of NHS services available.

Air quality and smoke exposure

People who have been close to the scene and exposed to smoke from the fire may have experienced irritation to the lining of their air passages, their skin and their eyes, and respiratory systems including coughing and wheezing, breathlessness, phlegm production and chest pain.

People who have concerns about their symptoms should seek medical advice or call NHS 111.

Mental health support

If you are affected by the Grenfell Tower fire, either directly or indirectly, and in need of mental health support or psychological therapy you can call a dedicated NHS response service number where you can get access to mental health support services as well as information and advice 24 hours a day.

The number to call is 0800 0234 650 or email cnw-tr.spa@nhs.net.

If you are worried about your mental health as a result of this event please see this NHS trauma leaflet (PDF, 50.2KB, 2 pages) It outlines common reactions, simple suggestions for how to cope and ways in which children may be supported to cope during the next few days.

Many symptoms may be a normal response to a terrible experience and will reduce over time. If your symptoms are severe and you are in distress or they last longer than 4 weeks, this may indicate the need for support from a mental health professional. The information on the NHS Choices website will outline possible symptoms and describe how to seek help. Please visit your GP who will be able to provide advice and refer you on to the appropriate local NHS mental health service for assessment and treatment.

If you are under 18, or concerned about someone who is under 18, please look on NHS Choices for your local children and young people’s mental health service. Children and young people may also access NHS help by visiting their GP, and schools may be able to provide support or refer them to local services.

Bereavement Support

Cruse Bereavement Care is a national charity for bereaved people in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Cruse offers support to adults, young people and children when someone dies, whatever the circumstances. They offer face-to-face, telephone, email and website support.

Their free phone helpline is 0808 808 1677 and is open Monday to Friday 9:30am to 5pm (excluding bank holidays), with extended hours to 8pm on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. You can also email them on helpline@cruse.org.uk. More information on all their services is available at http://www.cruse.org.uk.

How you can help

Volunteer

If you would like to volunteer to help with the support effort being co-ordinated by Kensington and Chelsea Borough Council please register your interest by emailing grenfellvolunteers@rbkc.gov.uk including your name, contact number and availability.

Donate

The Charity Commission has issued advice for anyone donating to those affected by the Grenfell Tower fire to ensure that their donations go to legitimate charities.

The Kensington and Chelsea Foundation has launched a Grenfell Tower appeal for funding, with support from London Funders and the London Emergency Trust Fund. Details of the appeal and how the public can support it can be found on their website.