Pursuing natural health & thinking beyond the superficial. Deconstructing Culture.

Sidenote moan – the summers here in sunnyland (not the real name) can be annoying, you know how people randomly space themselves out in places like beaches, parks, toilets, public transport so they can have a bit of privacy even if they’re close together? Well last year a bunch of commercial class vans set up a formation right behind us on the land behind us & our neighbours whereas everybody else was nicely spaced out. Also the back hedgerow was and still is cut down behind us only and not the neighbours so visitors behind and people at the front can look right through. Reminds me of the daffodils that kept getting their heads chopped off in front of us but no one elses. Sidenote note – we saw a lot of Spring blooms in Winter last year, t’was pretty.

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Ok, when it comes to US comic book heroines (mainly from DC and Marvel) one of the oldest and most famous heroines is Wonder Woman ‘Warrior Princess’ and does it surprise me that she is the most famous and one of the most well thought out? No. She is the archetypal Daughter and everybody wants the Daughter’s favour because that apparently implies having the Mother’s blessing and not having the Dark Mother as the enemy. The problem is the story is always manipulated and abused.

In Wonder Woman Diana is the Daughter and a ‘First’ figure, not a normal birth made from clay by the Mother Hippolyta the Amazon Queen and like Pandora (Dor-, Dora, Dorothea, Dorothy, Dolly), Diana is blessed by many of the pantheon. The Dark Mother was added later as Diana’s younger sister Troia (the triplicate) Darkstar who does not feature so much in this story but is reincarnated later as a Mother/Dark Mother morph in Xena: Warrior Princess (and Gabrielle the Daughter), whose history with the gods is similar to that of Hippolyta. The writers made sure to differentiate a little by saying that Xena was not an Amazon, however she was an honorary one and Gabrielle later received the title as their Queen albeit temporary, it was also through Gabrielle that Hope was born after she was raped in Britain/Britannia by the new monotheistic One God. Hope is later a lover of Ares and bears ‘the Destroyer’ (a monster son, like that forced on Hippolyta by Ares), after their death the Furies try to bring about the death of Xena’s daughter Eve. It is a horribly, horribly twisted story, and remember it has its roots in India which was then (historically and disputed by some Indian scholars) thought to be invaded/corrupted by a Northern influence, following the changes in Egypt and Mesopotamia. Xena’s chakram is an Indian weapon, the first one referenced as a weapon of Indian gods and being one of a pair: Light and Dark, the Dark one stolen by Ares from a masculine god called Kal but as we know the Greaco-Roman cultures are copies and morphs of what was there before and the root Dark Goddess is Kali, and Ares gave that chakram to Xena, the Dark Mother figure of the story. Her second chakram is a united dual yin-yang version. Even the title for the Daughter i.e. ‘Princess’ is ‘Kar’ or ‘Kaur’ in Indian, and the root Indo-Iranian ‘Kar-‘ make, build, war – can be used for warrior (in this case that would read amazon), a middle name many Indian females have.

Wonder Woman as a Graeco-Romanized version and includes the Persephone story where the Daughter is separated from her Mother, that is a version of the older Ishtar and Inanna story. Covering all bases the ‘creators’ of Wonder Woman based her Mother’s home on Paradise Island, a direct rip off of the island/home of the Creator Divine Mother Devi Lalita and the Sri Yantra (all the old goddesses combined in one geometric mandala/pagoda which has been changed to include modern gods and goddesses). Lalitha is both the creator of the universe/multi-verse and all beings/bodies as well as the uni/multiverse it/themselves (the formed and formless way of explaining). Whilst the Sri Yantra represents all the goddess forms together and separate, it is also a vehicle. In some depictions the throne consists of the corpses of the invading and current pantheon of Hindu gods – so it is prophetic, the dark star system (Nibiru et al) being the throne of the goddess. The ‘children’/creation/workers conquered/tricked/deceived the Mother but their end is foretold/already decided.

As usual to come into the modern/Vedic world the feminine is masculanized in some way, so Diana the Princess becomes Diana Prince as her alias in the USA, the US being one big mesh of ancient Egyptian to later Graeco-Roman symbolism. Diana’s creation is also changed into a human style birth in later versions of Wonder Woman, fathered by Zeus, following deception, drugging and rape of Hippolyta and the Amazons by Hercules and his men orchestrated by Ares (when Hippolyta had wanted peace); and as usual later on Zeus also wants to rape the Daughter Wonder Woman. In the Wonder Woman story, after this massive defeat and degradation half of the Amazon population move to a fictional location in the Middle East. The is the conquering of the root Goddess/Feminine by the later God/Patriarchal culture. The father raping the daughter, and indeed continued practice of some ‘religious’ and magic practitioners as my Mother was after she was brought to Britain to be brutalised and enslaved as a child – a Living God where the family believed through her suffering and purity/good behaviour they would also benefit – very Christ like (again an Indian term) where the innocent is sacrificed/used by the many thinking they can be forgiven/redeemed that way – is constant in old/changeover cultures such as Ares being the father of Hippolyta in Amazon legend.

In at least one of the few matrilineal societies in India the inheritance goes to the youngest daughter who is supposed to act as caretaker to the rest (in practice of course older children are substitute parents) but by caretaker they mean the benefactor of the spoils; in our case the children of Mum’s generation were named after historical ages of creation and humanity via the divine god and concept names (similar to how the Wonder Woman saga is split into ages/yugas; Gold, Silver, Bronze, Modern) and after the suffering of the eldest the ‘victor’ is the youngest – my Mum used to be told how her youngest sister got wonderful things for her wedding and would be happy etc whilst Mum was forced and manipulated into marriages and got nothing. So us eldest born have all the sh*t and the youngsters are supposed to reap, just as Mum and I have almost always been poor whereas others had benefits like learning to drive, jobs of their choosing, property. My Mother was told when she wanted to drive “if you learned to drive, you could go anywhere and we’d lose you” amongst many of the things she’s been told in her life like a mason stranger asking her to “give us Mars” and “we want to sell shares in you” (as if they haven’t already been taking pounds of flesh/stocks in the life/energy). Some masons took it upon themselves to start calling me Christina, the Divine Child, the Princess in the Pyramid, and prior to all that there was a random group of people who stopped me on a Valentine’s Day outside where we lived and asked me to be their ‘Pandora’, although a similar thing happened in New Orleans previously. Interesting enough in December 2012 the the ‘First Born’, the first child, son, of Hera and Zeus was added to the Wonder Woman story as Diana’s enemy and again copying the Lalita Indian culture – the prophecy surrounding the ‘First Born’ was that he would sit on his father’s throne with his family’s corpses around him. The use of Diana vs First Born reflects similar customs of the ‘dark’ and ‘light’ child in some Asian societies where the ‘dark’ is seen as negative and the ‘light’ positive, the ‘light’ usually being the privileged child who has the fun, prestige and honour; this yin yang symbolism is even more poignant if first borns are used and their birthdays solstices.

The story is ingrained in people, people are their stories whether they know it or not and there are people who go to lengths to keep the stories and the lines going (powerful bloodlines consider themselves god and god/alien descendents), the storytellers e.g. media and education keep them in the cultural consciousness too, adapting to the times. You don’t have to know these people to be affected by them but typically children are sold out/groomed by people in their lives.

Much twisting was utilized to include the Mother-Daughter story into the cradles of civilization and it morphed from herstory to history even more when eventually it became a tool for US American patriotism and using the ‘love’ angle to pair/confuse/distract the Goddess with an entirely unsuitable ‘partner’ to keep Her in place especially when the Goddess doesn’t mate. Steve couldn’t have any better than Diana, whereas she could have much better. She never should have left the Aegean Sea let alone by herself.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/origin-story-wonder-woman-180952710/?no-ist

The Surprising Origin Story of Wonder Woman
The history of the comic-book superhero’s creation seven decades ago has been hidden away—until now

“Noted Psychologist Revealed as Author of Best-Selling ‘Wonder Woman,’” read the astonishing headline. In the summer of 1942, a press release from the New York offices of All-American Comics turned up at newspapers, magazines and radio stations all over the United States. The identity of Wonder Woman’s creator had been “at first kept secret,” it said, but the time had come to make a shocking announcement: “the author of ‘Wonder Woman’ is Dr. William Moulton Marston, internationally famous psychologist.” The truth about Wonder Woman had come out at last.

Or so, at least, it was made to appear. But, really, the name of Wonder Woman’s creator was the least of her secrets.

Wonder Woman is the most popular female comic-book superhero of all time. Aside from Superman and Batman, no other comic-book character has lasted as long. Generations of girls have carried their sandwiches to school in Wonder Woman lunchboxes. Like every other superhero, Wonder Woman has a secret identity. Unlike every other superhero, she also has a secret history.

In one episode, a newspaper editor named Brown, desperate to discover Wonder Woman’s past, assigns a team of reporters to chase her down; she easily escapes them. Brown, gone half mad, is committed to a hospital. Wonder Woman disguises herself as a nurse and brings him a scroll. “This parchment seems to be the history of that girl you call ‘Wonder Woman’!” she tells him. “A strange, veiled woman left it with me.” Brown leaps out of bed and races back to the city desk, where he cries out, parchment in hand, “Stop the presses! I’ve got the history of Wonder Woman!” But Wonder Woman’s secret history isn’t written on parchment. Instead, it lies buried in boxes and cabinets and drawers, in thousands of documents, housed in libraries, archives and collections spread all over the United States, including the private papers of creator Marston—papers that, before I saw them, had never before been seen by anyone outside of Marston’s family.

The veil that has shrouded Wonder Woman’s past for seven decades hides beneath it a crucial story about comic books and superheroes and censorship and feminism. As Marston once put it, “Frankly, Wonder Woman is psychological propaganda for the new type of woman who, I believe, should rule the world.”

Comic books were more or less invented in 1933 by Maxwell Charles Gaines, a former elementary school principal who went on to found All-American Comics. Superman first bounded over tall buildings in 1938. Batman began lurking in the shadows in 1939. Kids read them by the piles. But at a time when war was ravaging Europe, comic books celebrated violence, even sexual violence. In 1940, the Chicago Daily News called comics a “national disgrace.” “Ten million copies of these sex-horror serials are sold every month,” wrote the newspaper’s literary editor, calling for parents and teachers to ban the comics, “unless we want a coming generation even more ferocious than the present one.”

To defend himself against critics, Gaines, in 1940, hired Marston as a consultant. “‘Doc’ Marston has long been an advocate of the right type of comic magazines,” he explained. Marston held three degrees from Harvard, including a PhD in psychology. He led what he called “an experimental life.” He’d been a lawyer, a scientist and a professor. He is generally credited with inventing the lie detector test: He was obsessed with uncovering other people’s secrets. He’d been a consulting psychologist for Universal Pictures. He’d written screenplays, a novel and dozens of magazine articles. Gaines had read about Marston in an article in Family Circle magazine. In the summer of 1940, Olive Richard, a staff writer for the magazine, visited Marston at his house in Rye, New York, to ask him for his expert opinion about comics.

“Some of them are full of torture, kidnapping, sadism, and other cruel business,” she said.

“Unfortunately, that is true,” Marston admitted, but “when a lovely heroine is bound to the stake, comics followers are sure that the rescue will arrive in the nick of time. The reader’s wish is to save the girl, not to see her suffer.”

Marston was a man of a thousand lives and a thousand lies. “Olive Richard” was the pen name of Olive Byrne, and she hadn’t gone to visit Marston—she lived with him. She was also the niece of Margaret Sanger, one of the most important feminists of the 20th century. In 1916, Sanger and her sister, Ethel Byrne, Olive Byrne’s mother, had opened the first birth-control clinic in the United States. They were both arrested for the illegal distribution of contraception. In jail in 1917, Ethel Byrne went on a hunger strike and nearly died.

Olive Byrne met Marston in 1925, when she was a senior at Tufts; he was her psychology professor. Marston was already married, to a lawyer named Elizabeth Holloway. When Marston and Byrne fell in love, he gave Holloway a choice: either Byrne could live with them, or he would leave her. Byrne moved in. Between 1928 and 1933, each woman bore two children; they lived together as a family. Holloway went to work; Byrne stayed home and raised the children. They told census-takers and anyone else who asked that Byrne was Marston’s widowed sister-in-law. “Tolerant people are the happiest,” Marston wrote in a magazine essay in 1939, so “why not get rid of costly prejudices that hold you back?” He listed the “Six Most Common Types of Prejudice.” Eliminating prejudice number six—“Prejudice against unconventional people and non-conformists”—meant the most to him. Byrne’s sons didn’t find out that Marston was their father until 1963—when Holloway finally admitted it—and only after she extracted a promise that no one would raise the subject ever again.

Gaines didn’t know any of this when he met Marston in 1940 or else he would never have hired him: He was looking to avoid controversy, not to court it. Marston and Wonder Woman were pivotal to the creation of what became DC Comics. (DC was short for Detective Comics, the comic book in which Batman debuted.) In 1940, Gaines decided to counter his critics by forming an editorial advisory board and appointing Marston to serve on it, and DC decided to stamp comic books in which Superman and Batman appeared with a logo, an assurance of quality, reading, “A DC Publication.” And, since “the comics’ worst offense was their blood-curdling masculinity,” Marston said, the best way to fend off critics would be to create a female superhero.

“Well, Doc,” Gaines said, “I picked Superman after every syndicate in America turned it down. I’ll take a chance on your Wonder Woman! But you’ll have to write the strip yourself.”

In February 1941, Marston submitted a draft of his first script, explaining the “under-meaning” of Wonder Woman’s Amazonian origins in ancient Greece, where men had kept women in chains, until they broke free and escaped. “The NEW WOMEN thus freed and strengthened by supporting themselves (on Paradise Island) developed enormous physical and mental power.” His comic, he said, was meant to chronicle “a great movement now under way—the growth in the power of women.”

Wonder Woman made her debut in All-Star Comics at the end of 1941 and on the cover of a new comic book, Sensation Comics, at the beginning of 1942, drawn by an artist named Harry G. Peter. She wore a golden tiara, a red bustier, blue underpants and knee-high, red leather boots. She was a little slinky; she was very kinky. She’d left Paradise to fight fascism with feminism, in “America, the last citadel of democracy, and of equal rights for women!”

It seemed to Gaines like so much good, clean, superpatriotic fun. But in March 1942, the National Organization for Decent Literature put Sensation Comics on its blacklist of “Publications Disapproved for Youth” for one reason: “Wonder Woman is not sufficiently dressed.”

Gaines decided he needed another expert. He turned to Lauretta Bender, an associate professor of psychiatry at New York University’s medical school and a senior psychiatrist at Bellevue Hospital, where she was director of the children’s ward, an expert on aggression. She’d long been interested in comics but her interest had grown in 1940, after her husband, Paul Schilder, was killed by a car while walking home from visiting Bender and their 8-day-old daughter in the hospital. Bender, left with three children under the age of 3, soon became painfully interested in studying how children cope with trauma. In 1940, she conducted a study with Reginald Lourie, a medical resident under her supervision, investigating the effect of comics on four children brought to Bellevue Hospital for behavioral problems. Tessie, 12, had witnessed her father, a convicted murderer, kill himself. She insisted on calling herself Shiera, after a comic-book girl who is always rescued at the last minute by the Flash. Kenneth, 11, had been raped. He was frantic unless medicated or “wearing a Superman cape.” He felt safe in it—he could fly away if he wanted to—and “he felt that the cape protected him from an assault.” Bender and Lourie concluded the comic books were “the folklore of this age,” and worked, culturally, the same way fables and fairy tales did.

That hardly ended the controversy. In February 1943, Josette Frank, an expert on children’s literature, a leader of the Child Study Association and a member of Gaines’ advisory board, sent Gaines a letter, telling him that while she’d never been a fan of Wonder Woman, she felt she now had to speak out about its “sadistic bits showing women chained, tortured, etc.” She had a point. In episode after episode, Wonder Woman is chained, bound, gagged, lassoed, tied, fettered and manacled. “Great girdle of Aphrodite!” she cries at one point. “Am I tired of being tied up!”

The story behind the writing and editing of Wonder Woman can be pieced together from Bender’s papers, at Brooklyn College; Frank’s papers, at the University of Minnesota; and Marston’s editorial correspondence, along with a set of original scripts, housed at the Dibner Library at the Smithsonian Institution Libraries. In his original scripts, Marston described scenes of bondage in careful, intimate detail with utmost precision. For a story about Mars, the God of War, Marston gave Peter elaborate instructions for the panel in which Wonder Woman is taken prisoner:

“Closeup, full length figure of WW. Do some careful chaining here—Mars’s men are experts! Put a metal collar on WW with a chain running off from the panel, as though she were chained in the line of prisoners. Have her hands clasped together at her breast with double bands on her wrists, her Amazon bracelets and another set. Between these runs a short chain, about the length of a handcuff chain—this is what compels her to clasp her hands together. Then put another, heavier, larger chain between her wrist bands which hangs in a long loop to just above her knees. At her ankles show a pair of arms and hands, coming from out of the panel, clasping about her ankles. This whole panel will lose its point and spoil the story unless these chains are drawn exactly as described here.”

Later in the story, Wonder Woman is locked in a cell. Straining to overhear a conversation in the next room, through the amplification of “bone conduction,” she takes her chain in her teeth: “Closeup of WW’s head shoulders. She holds her neck chain between her teeth. The chain runs taut between her teeth and the wall, where it is locked to a steel ring bolt.”

Gaines forwarded Frank’s letter of complaint to Marston. Marston shrugged it off. But then Dorothy Roubicek, who helped edit Wonder Woman—the first woman editor at DC Comics—objected to Wonder Woman’s torture, too.

“Of course I wouldn’t expect Miss Roubicek to understand all this,” Marston wrote Gaines. “After all I have devoted my entire life to working out psychological principles. Miss R. has been in comics only 6 months or so, hasn’t she? And never in psychology.” But “the secret of woman’s allure,” he told Gaines, is that “women enjoy submission—being bound.”

Marston wrote Gaines right back.

“I have the good Sergeant’s letter in which he expresses his enthusiasm over chains for women—so what?” As a practicing clinical psychologist, he said, he was unimpressed. “Some day I’ll make you a list of all the items about women that different people have been known to get passionate over—women’s hair, boots, belts, silk worn by women, gloves, stockings, garters, panties, bare backs,” he promised. “You can’t have a real woman character in any form of fiction without touching off a great many readers’ erotic fancies. Which is swell, I say.”

Marston was sure he knew what line not to cross. Harmless erotic fantasies are terrific, he said. “It’s the lousy ones you have to look out for—the harmful, destructive, morbid erotic fixations—real sadism, killing, blood-letting, torturing where the pleasure is in the victim’s actual pain, etc. Those are 100 per cent bad and I won’t have any part of them.” He added, in closing, “Please thank Miss Roubicek for the list of menaces.”

In 1944, Gaines and Marston signed an agreement for Wonder Woman to become a newspaper strip, syndicated by King Features. Busy with the newspaper strip, Marston hired an 18-year-old student, Joye Hummel, to help him write comic-book scripts. Joye Hummel, now Joye Kelly, turned 90 this April; in June, she donated her collection of never-before-seen scripts and comic books to the Smithsonian Libraries. Hiring her helped with Marston’s editorial problem, too. Her stories were more innocent than his. She’d type them and bring them to Sheldon Mayer, Marston’s editor at DC, she told me, and “He always OK’d mine faster because I didn’t make mine as sexy.” To celebrate syndication, Gaines had his artists draw a panel in which Superman and Batman, rising out of the front page of a daily newspaper, call out to Wonder Woman, who’s leaping onto the page, “Welcome, Wonder Woman!”

Gaines had another kind of welcome to make, too. He asked Lauretta Bender to take Frank’s place on the editorial advisory board.

In an ad King Features ran to persuade newspapers to purchase the strip, pointing out that Wonder Woman already had “ten million loyal fans,” her name is written in rope.

Hidden behind this controversy is one reason for all those chains and ropes, which has to do with the history of the fight for women’s rights. Because Marston kept his true relationship with Olive Byrne a secret, he kept his family’s ties to Margaret Sanger a secret, too. Marston, Byrne and Holloway, and even Harry G. Peter, the artist who drew Wonder Woman, had all been powerfully influenced by the suffrage, feminism and birth control movements. And each of those movements had used chains as a centerpiece of its iconography.

In 1911, when Marston was a freshman at Harvard, the British suffragist Emmeline Pankhurst, who’d chained herself to the gates outside 10 Downing Street, came to speak on campus. When Sanger faced charges of obscenity for explaining birth control in a magazine she founded called the Woman Rebel, a petition sent to President Woodrow Wilson on her behalf read, “While men stand proudly and face the sun, boasting that they have quenched the wickedness of slavery, what chains of slavery are, have been or ever could be so intimate a horror as the shackles on every limb—on every thought—on the very soul of an unwilling pregnant woman?” American suffragists threatened to chain themselves to the gates outside the White House. In 1916, in Chicago, women representing the states where women had still not gained the right to vote marched in chains.

In the 1910s, Peter was a staff artist at the magazine Judge, where he contributed to its suffrage page called “The Modern Woman,” which ran from 1912 to 1917. More regularly, the art on that page was drawn by another staff artist, a woman named Lou Rogers. Rogers’ suffrage and feminist cartoons very often featured an allegorical woman chained or roped, breaking her bonds. Sanger hired Rogers as art director for the Birth Control Review, a magazine she started in 1917. In 1920, in a book called Woman and the New Race, Sanger argued that woman “had chained herself to her place in society and the family through the maternal functions of her nature, and only chains thus strong could have bound her to her lot as a brood animal.” In 1923, an illustration commissioned by Rogers for the cover of Birth Control Review pictured a weakened and desperate woman, fallen to her knees and chained at the ankle to a ball that reads, “UNWANTED BABIES.” A chained woman inspired the title of Sanger’s 1928 book, Motherhood in Bondage, a compilation of some of the thousands of letters she had received from women begging her for information about birth control; she described the letters as “the confessions of enslaved mothers.”
When Marston created Wonder Woman, in 1941, he drew on Sanger’s legacy and inspiration. But he was also determined to keep the influence of Sanger on Wonder Woman a secret.

He took that secret to his grave when he died in 1947. Most superheroes didn’t survive peacetime and those that did were changed forever in 1954, when a psychiatrist named Fredric Wertham published a book called Seduction of the Innocent and testified before a Senate subcommittee investigating the comics. Wertham believed that comics were corrupting American kids, and turning them into juvenile delinquents. He especially disliked Wonder Woman. Bender had written that Wonder Woman comics display “a strikingly advanced concept of femininity and masculinity” and that “women in these stories are placed on an equal footing with men and indulge in the same type of activities.” Wertham found the feminism in Wonder Woman repulsive.

“As to the ‘advanced femininity,’ what are the activities in comic books which women ‘indulge in on an equal footing with men’? They do not work. They are not homemakers. They do not bring up a family. Mother-love is entirely absent. Even when Wonder Woman adopts a girl there are Lesbian overtones,” he said. At the Senate hearings, Bender testified, too. If anything in American popular culture was bad for girls, she said, it wasn’t Wonder Woman; it was Walt Disney. “The mothers are always killed or sent to the insane asylums in Walt Disney movies,” she said. This argument fell on deaf ears.

Wertham’s papers, housed at the Library of Congress, were only opened to researchers in 2010. They suggest that Wertham’s antipathy toward Bender had less to do with the content of the comics than with professional rivalry. (Paul Schilder, Bender’s late husband, had been Wertham’s boss for many years.) Wertham’s papers contain a scrap on which he compiled a list he titled “Paid Experts of the Comic Book Industry Posing as Independent Scholars.” First on the list as the comic book industry’s number one lackey was Bender, about whom Wertham wrote: “Boasted privately of bringing up her 3 children on money from crime comic books.”

In the wake of the 1954 hearings, DC Comics removed Bender from its editorial advisory board, and the Comics Magazine Association of America adopted a new code. Under its terms, comic books could contain nothing cruel: “All scenes of horror, excessive bloodshed, gory or gruesome crimes, depravity, lust, sadism, masochism shall not be permitted.” There could be nothing kinky: “Illicit sex relations are neither to be hinted at nor portrayed. Violent love scenes as well as sexual abnormalities are unacceptable.” And there could be nothing unconventional: “The treatment of love-romance stories shall emphasize the value of the home and the sanctity of marriage.”

“Anniversary, which we forgot entirely,” Olive Byrne wrote in her secret diary in 1936. (The diary remains in family hands.) During the years when she lived with Marston and Holloway, she wore, instead of a wedding ring, a pair of bracelets. Wonder Woman wears those same cuffs. Byrne died in 1990, at the age of 86. She and Holloway had been living together in an apartment in Tampa. While Byrne was in the hospital, dying, Holloway fell and broke her hip; she was admitted to the same hospital. They were in separate rooms. They’d lived together for 64 years. When Holloway, in her hospital bed, was told that Byrne had died, she sang a poem by Tennyson: “Sunset and the evening star, / And one clear call for me! / And may there be no moaning of the bar, / When I put out to sea.” No newspaper ran an obituary.

Elizabeth Holloway Marston died in 1993. An obituary ran in the New York Times. It was headed, “Elizabeth H. Marston, Inspiration for Wonder Woman, 100.” This was, at best, a half-truth.

So, seriously educated and influential people involved, the writer credited with being pivotal in the invention of the lie detector and if you’ve seen the first two seasons of the most famous serialized tv adaptation with Lynda Carter (from Phoenix [winged fireball], Arizona) – it’s almost all war propaganda. Like with almost all Mother Goddess story based media I’ve seen there is an expectation there, a right to have ownership of the Divine Mother/Daughter/Dark Mother, to have her seeming consent and validation whilst treating her/them like crap yet still want her/them to rescue, forgive, even love unconditionally and let them continue as if nothing happened/changed. In Wonder Woman – Diana is a founding member of the Justice League, she stands up for the Allies and is the connection between the human world and Paradise. If you’ve known masons, you might have noted the obsession with doors; opening doors for people and generally being chivalrous and courteous is part of my nature but in one particularly masonic town Mum and I have noticed people rushing to go through doors/fences etc at the same time as us e.g. if they’re in front they will slowly go to the door, look back at us continually and if we stop they stop, if they make it first they wait until we get there for us to open the ‘portal’/’link’, if we overtake them they’ll speed up to catch up and even push themselves through with us. Or a shop/place of business can be empty and then suddenly people will hurry to go through at the same time. Symbolism and the appearance of ‘permission’ and ‘partnership’ is very important to these people. We don’t open doors for anybody anymore but it’s hard to go through by ourselves, ironically the front door to our residence there became very hard to open/close after we moved in, the opposite to another place we lived where the front door was fine when we went to see the place before moving in (being renovated) but when we moved in it had become too easy to open/close (being an expensive security door the people weren’t willing to change it [again] after we noted it) but we didn’t live alone there so access may have been made easier for those who wanted to be in the same place.

It’s silly and might as well be superstition, wishes of the desperate, but that’s ritual for you and we’ve come across numerous rites of passage. These are people who want to be seen talking to us, seen/living nearby, or when part of our conversation is repeated by people standing 20ft further down the road when we walk past them, shops that are empty that fill up when we go in them and I’ve had shop owners say to me “you’re my lucky charm”, “you bring in business”, people who walk past seemingly just to cough or laugh right at us. Then there’s the cars; there’s been times when I was walking in car parks or as proper on the side of country roads and suddenly turned around to almost have a car bump into me and then decide to use the rest of the road, once a driver laughed, another time a van almost drove into Mum’s arm, other people follow you in their cars like one occasion where a woman stopped her car to ask us what we were doing (we’d stopped to take a break, and when she stopped another car coming from the opposite direction stopped to watch) then invited us to have tea at her place, described where it was (same place we were staying), winked and drove there. We didn’t go, the next time she was with her partner and children and they stopped us on that same road to ask what we were doing and what religion we were (we’re not religious) and this time asked if we wanted a lift. We declined, they still wanted to know if believed in any god, I was declining and politely trying to stop the conversation but Mum said the Goddess Kali and then they got really questioning, wouldn’t leave us alone, stopped traffic three times to crawl along at our pace, stopped and parked twice further down the road to stop us and ask about Kali and why we wouldn’t tell them anything about her, why were were being so ‘nasty’ to them, how there is only Christianity and their God yet they were ones wanting to follow us not the other way round – we’d said to look online and leave us alone because they were harassing us down the 1.5 mile road. Then there’s the vehicles that don’t go anywhere, they drive past on the road, turn around and come back and as they pass stare at us; at another place there was one van that always came and went when we did, it didn’t matter what time of the day/night, one time we came back really late 4am-ish and it still hurtled past. Another place we went camping, no space for vehicles where we camped but as soon as we left the next morning and got to the road all the drivers parked there started up and left too. Thankfully the idiots dressed in Black (yes it sounds ridiculous, and it is) aren’t as obvious anymore, one occasion two particular dummies actually zigged zagged after us in a field – when we went one direction they did, changed direction so did they, stopped to look at the ducks, they did too, started to go, so did they – and then I looked to the road on the side and lo and behold there’s another guy, this one with sunglasses on a cloudy day, keeping pace with us on the other side of the bushes and looked away as soon as I saw him. Another time we were returning to a place after visiting the beach and on the way back a MiB (ack that is such an embarrassing term) was staring at us from an alley whilst on his phone and as we passed we heard him say “they’re on their way back”, that was after another one of them was sitting behind Mum on the beach throwing pebbles next to her.

Speaking of US American Patriotism

From 1982 the World Wrestling Federation started using the Wonder Woman logo as their base.

Wonder Woman Nibiru Symbol Symbolism

Wonder Woman – very Nibiru looking

Wonder Woman Nibiru Symbol Symbolism

New version

Arizona state flag

Arizona state flag, the best one (along with the combined US one) suited to Wonder Woman’s costume. Lynda Carter is from Arizona.

US state flags

heersander.deviantart.com

Obviously the world of professional sports entertainment and in particular wrestling is full of ‘characters’; a soap opera with stuntpersonship but also a heck of a lot of rivalry and feuds, the backstage comes into the ‘squared circle/ring’ at times. It sometimes seems like the gods, monsters, demons, demi-gods, spirits etc live on in comic books and manga related media but the heroes and villains are the stars, superstars, faces, and heels in wrestling too – especially since it’s so pantomime. Elaborate characters, costume, names/moves, themes – all very gladiatorial amphitheater entertainment as if Romans were still around. I used to watch a lot of it myself when I was much younger. In regards to the logo it symbolically implies they have the blessing of the goddess, no they didn’t and they don’t, and I’m glad the World Wildlife Fund took exception to them as well (for sharing the same acronym and breaking a trade agreement) forcing the World Wrestling Federation to change their name in 2001. Nature beats wannabes any day😛 (Though I’m not keen on some of the key people behind the now called World Wide Fund for Nature, same goes for any company/corporation/financial institution/major charity, when I say ‘Nature’ I mean actual Nature, not the orchestrators.) The WWE, ECW and TNA even used an Indian man who calls himself ‘The Great Khali’ (initially along with his ‘manager’ and partner ‘Tiger Raj Singh’). You’re dreaming, posers.

Just as names are important for people, names and logos are important for companies, especially big companies from Starbucks using the Abraxas two ‘legged’ serpent god icon as is but to a modern person it looks like a mermaid but it goes with their name – star worshipers wanting your resources – to Apple (knowledge) and Windows (portals) and both those logos are split into colours/levels.

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http://sputniknews.com/business/20160510/1039342720/Panama-Papers-Go-Online.html Search Away: Hacked Panama Papers Go Online The notorious Panama Papers, the largest document leak in history, exposing offshore tax haven users, is now online as a searchable database. The enormous bundle of 11.5 million documents exposing hundreds of thousands of companies and individuals is online as a searchable database with interactive visualization depicting […]

Throughout our lives when Mum & I have moved residence interesting changes tend to happen, the place starts off as a hovel – we have had holes in the walls, doors, damp, leaks, mould and bodily fluids on the furniture, stuck doors & windows, big burns in the carpet, us losing gas/electricity but not the […]

What is sacred sex?

Ritualistic sex.

That’s all?

Yep, that’s it.

So how is it any different to pay per view?

It’s not.

Eh?

If you want to be a voyeur there’s live sex shows in places like New Orleans, seedy places worldwide, probably down the street in a town near you, and hey burlesque and pole dancing having been made into an art form with women fighting for the chance to prove how adept they are, you know instead of being forced mostly like they used to.

Burlesque is art, it’s not… Distasteful.

Really. I remember an episode of Sharon Osborne’s pathetic attempt at talk show hosting (it was on in the background) where she had Dita Von Teese on and acted like Dita was better/higher class/more sophisticated/superior to a common stripper; Dita had the pretend decency to quietly half-say that she wasn’t but Sharon was having none of it “you’re the only woman I’d let strip for my husband, at his birthday party he was wearing your bra on his head and so happy!” Yeah I bet. Burlesque is for people who like pomp, airs and graces who prefer to wait and have someone take longer to remove their clothing. That’s it. Titillation, drawn out, teased. Don’t look down on the common ‘exotic dancer’ because she needs her rent paid double quick or she’ll lose her kids to social services (though you can lose your children for all manner of things; the ‘wrong’ diet even if it’s healthy/ier, vaccinations, home schooling…)

Sharon also had Kerry Katona on and insulting the first ‘kiss and tell’ woman who apparently started the trend even though she hadn’t actually been a kiss and tell person. She wasn’t a golddigger. “No offense” as Kerry said whilst not listening.

What does this have to do with sacred sex?

Some people are exhibitionists and so make their beliefs into a religion/part of a religion. Sex was a lot riskier (and still is in much of the world) since pregnancy is like an illness in the way the body initially reacts/tries to fight it off/flush it out until it realizes it’s not going to work (if it’s not a failed pregnancy) and so starts supporting it instead and the host has to consume more to manage, then of course childbirth and afterbirth are high risk. But ‘sacred sex’ has been/is popular with the ‘culturally sophisticated/modern’ world and would be suitable as modern concept since it’s a novelty rather than the norm and in this day and age where sex (in countries with higher guaranteed contraception and natal care) is less likely to be as problematic. People can ‘get into it’ more in modern times. In ancient times they were more likely to lose the girl/woman, something that technically doesn’t matter so much in large populations but realistically does if/when it’s a loved one. Otherwise you can just get another, there’s lots of desperate people and traffickers.

Some people saw it as sacred because it’s an avenue for procreation, the modern audience can understand that; though it didn’t have to be a loving bond, you didn’t have to really know the person at all. So it easily turned into selling your daughters into being priestesses (a bit like Living Gods though they’re supposed to be ‘pure’/strictly behaved, caged and some have a best before date) and thinking it a great honour. Similar to high level priests who die and his co-workers go to a local village and pronounce some ‘lucky’ newborn as their recently deceased figurehead. Of course this led to those priestesses/sex toys being called prostitutes much like actresses are called that, though for some reason not actors. Acting includes casual sexual relations as part of the job and understandably many affairs occur when people are pretending to be someone else yet doing the actions with their body – unless they can disassociate and/or control their hormones – then the lines between co-worker and lover get blurred despite the chastity pillow, like that would stop arousal. It’s much easier for them and us to accept that it’s part of their life and ‘no big deal’ under the noble art of imitation. They are the gods/goddesses of our times afterall, even if they’re acting.

The importance of menstrual blood, eggs and the fifth element aka electricity lost to people who really just wanted to think every time they had sex with their wife, mistress or ‘prostitute’ they were doing something sacred and superior. Also great for people who like to watch. That’s why it’s easy for some people who talk about ‘natural, free, beautiful love’ and “do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law. Love is the law, love under will.” to recruit people who don’t know any better. Aleicester Crowley, obsessed with sex and sex magic, an example. He knew the masonic beliefs he was talking about just like the scientists who transfer genes and foreign molecules into cells via laser do, there’s many uses for it (though people are most concerned with ‘designer babies’) but when transferring from species to another it also involves cloning DNA. Imitation is the primary goal of freemasonry; copying the creator/architect ‘G’, tweaking and controlling life whether animate or inanimate to call themselves god, or at least ‘its’ representative regardless of what industry they’re in. But people think they’re going to opened up to a whole new experience of wonder and being one with nature, when it comes to sacred sex at least.

Stanley Kubrick adapted ‘A Clockwork Orange’ (1971) which showed a similar ‘do what thou wilt’ philosophy but the problem with film was it glorified the gang leader/rapist. He showed that pharmaceuticals and new practices are tested on prisoners (hey everybody wants their paper recognized and the esteem/praise of their peers, not to mention sponsorships and grants, plus a lot of us just like the taste of power – including many of those who ended up in prison) but it didn’t highlight that they basically castrated him – something a lot of people would have been ok with instead. It was ok for the authorities to punish him as they wanted but the victims? No of course not, taking away his appreciation for classical music was made into a massive thing as though they were taking away his humanity. There’s rapists and music/dance lovers in countless species. We’re not special because we can make and like music, there’s plenty of animals that have better pipes naturally and sense for sound/hearing than we do, those who can communicate over miles without wires or wireless transmitters, not to mention those who can get their groove on and boogie.😉 He stepped up his game with ‘Eyes Wide Shut’ (1999) and died right after (reminds me of the death of Aaliyah after playing sex & blood lusting Akasha in ‘Queen of the Damned’ – 2002, and potentially Brandon Lee in ‘The Crow’ – 1994 – who was shot when his character walked in on the rape scene).

Ritual sex isn’t sacred?

No. It’s not ‘making love’. Although if you’re doing a ritual for the sake of getting something other than an STD or pregnancy, say perhaps the attention of the gods and proving yourself, then you could say yes, since you’re doing a spell and/or it’s part of your belief system. That’s how many people think their children are god sent, when they’ve conducted the ‘proper’ rites for sex. They got the gods attention with their organized heightened emotional state and god decided to bless them or if they’re really the creme de la creme come to you as a baby avatar.

There are plenty of people who ‘feed’ off the heightened emotional states of others, it keeps them going, from fandom to those who love provoking/pushing/coercing/manipulating/stalking someone. Psychic vampires some call them which is concentrated form of people’s general need to follow or have attention. But what if there were others who sacred sex folk were trying to entice or use their ritual as a form of worship to? It’s an invocation, and do those beings take no for an answer? What if they decide that not just you but the rest of your line will make suitable fodder? That’s where we get ‘deals with the devil’ from, a phrase also used by celebs after they realize what they’ve gotten in to, often far too late of their tailspin of lows and bringing others into the disaster that is their life to take the edge off via proxy. Although in that case you could call the ‘devil’ their managers, handlers, agency etc.

What about Tantra?

Tantric yoga is Vedic and part of the use of old concepts and converting and attributing them as signs and symbols to Hinduism and its followers e.g. the complete geometrical sri yantra (yantras later being called madalas) of Lalita being called Mount Meru and associated with Shaktism. No one’s saying that sex isn’t exercise but do you need to have sex to what became religious paraphernalia ‘The Exorcist’ (1973) style. Intriguing how people wouldn’t have sex [in an obvious way] in front of their parents but don’t mind in front of the ultimate parent/s. It’s not even in the ‘god is everywhere’ sense, it’s in the ‘we shall call and please god’ sense, getting ‘its’ attention. There might even be questions over what is considered more holy sex; hetero, homo, bi, orgy or masturbation? Which one would ‘god’ most approve of or maybe ‘it’ doesn’t play favourites like that. For a science that for Brahmans/ins supposed to develop the ‘super soul’ it’s strange how it’d be made harder via sexual distraction – I guess needing extreme concentration to manage having an orgasm whilst praying and focusing on religious objects takes someone of super level. Although quite a number of people are adept at visualizing someone else during sex.

I think it’s more like when we’re aroused we give off extra scent for example (along with other identifiers) along with our usual scents and for people who believe they’re attracting god via sex, maybe they’re attracting whatever hypothetical species that god represents.

Sacred sex reminds me of military recruiters who know they’ll do better in poor areas if they don’t have ‘career benefits’ to offer, but then again rape is a considered a professional hazard for them by them internally before even getting to outside enemies who might like the ‘spoils of war’.

Interestingly enough whilst kundalini yoga was from/influenced by Tantra and other yogas, part of what I like about it is the calm kundalini yoga produces for me, there’s more to the spine than the base point. All ‘chakras’ are supposed to work harmoniously (and many people describe varying number of ‘chakras’ in various places in/above the body). It changes the way you breath and removes the desires/needs caused by excess hormones and excessive consumption (sex is a relief of pain by build up, because we long to relieve it’s called an urge/need) – sex drive can be increased by eating/drinking too much and not going to the bathroom regularly so not helpful for those who are always in some state of indigestion, inflammation or constipation. I find exercise that tones, builds a bit maybe, defines but doesn’t bulk – enhances efficiency without needing to consume more. With yoga you’re working on more than your bones and muscles, you’re working with your nervous system and glands too for example this all has an affect on the mental/emotional state of humans and their energy – I found the effect to be that I got more nutrition out of a lot less which is how I understood the priests who practice it can thrive on less, do more, can live in higher altitudes (like swimming to prepare for high altitude) etc. Yoga as a system is pre-Vedic but not all types are, in Hinduism the general title has been incorporated as a branch in itself and exclusive for quite some time with Brahman/in yoga schools. With its changes and dissemination many people think of it as ‘new age mumbo jumbo’ but it’s a science that works; pressure points, breath, frequency/sound and movement of internal juices accounted for. So for me it ‘detoxes’ in more ways than one, allowing for self-control and freedom to choose, reducing the urges and making you more conscious of them instead of being subject to them. You in charge of your body, not the other way round and not for others to take advantage of either. (No that didn’t please the people who liked to come on to me because whilst uninterested as usual it also made me more able to ignore them.)

So if ‘I’ do manage sacred sex, despite everything ‘you’ve’ said won’t god/demon/deity/spirit/alien/high status religious distributor be proud of me?

I dunno, who knows what mood they’ll be in at the time; maybe they’ll find you pretty darned attractive and want a bit of bestiality, maybe they’ll point and laugh:

Dogma (1999)

METATRON: Look at sex. Sex is funny. One time I asked Him why you people had to look so stupid while procreating. He said if you didn’t, you’d do it all the
time, just for fun.

BETHANY: But we do.

METATRON: I know. And you all look so damn stupid doing it. It kills us upstairs.

BETHANY: Sex is a joke in Heaven?

METATRON: The way I understand it, it’s mostly a joke down here too.

I have a hard time believing that next to other forms of survival like food, water, shelter, tools and social relations along with culture and cultivation that sex for ritual/hierarchical power and prestige were so predominant in root cultures. It makes it easy to dismiss root peoples as fertility cults instead of those practices being part of religion, even puritanical religions who reserve the drug/sex/drinking/all ‘prohibited’ entertainment for the pillars of society and their thugs whilst pretending to be holier than thou.

People (and other creatures) enjoy sex (sometimes) because it’s a release (like needing to go to the toilet and can ‘pent up’), or even to alleviate boredom; we’ve idolized it partly because it can make babies and for mothers/expectant mothers that is a transformation of body and personality at least for the duration if not continuing afterwards. That disfiguring yet described as loving transformation for those who want it at the time is awe-inducing regardless but the awe doesn’t always last. Domestic violence and affairs increase during pregnancy and shortly after birth. The ideal for those that want it, love it, the feelings of it, each other etc and are happy afterwards but when we’re talking about ‘sacred sex’ we’re talking authority, legality, religion. Marriage for example, a much exalted ‘loving’ thing though fundamentally a legal contract; a marriage can depending on the place, religion and circumstance be annulled if not consummated – so sacred sex there is legal. It’s been approved, much like how sacred sex/tantra is the approved, virtuous, moral sex of post Vedic-god yet is an excuse for the desires of masonic hedonists and those who’d deem mother goddess cultures as fertility cults. Pre-Vedic and post-Vedic cultures show sex but also other forms of creation, even humans that procreated differently, if at all; plus there’s the argument between gods about whether humans should be allowed to procreate.

If people want to call their union sacred that’s their business, the law and religion dictates types of sex (and that’s not always bad thing e.g. underage sex, sexual offenses etc) but I disagree and don’t allow any/all, anyone nor anything conveying to me when or why to have sex, if at all, let alone because they think it’s up them whether they want to make it look like personal choice or otherwise.

P.S – I realize that I’ve started including actors/singers lately, but they do come into the purveyors of culture category.

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I change the look of the blog annually, this is the 6th makeover This was the last one:

There were 4 magazines I read regularly when I was 15/16; New Scientist, New Statesman, The Economist and Nexus Magazine. I ‘like’ how the latest two issues of New Scientist have used the latest themes: ‘Drowning in sound, the sad case of the baby beluga whale’ (remember even those deep underwater aren’t immune to our […]

I finally part watched/part listened to the adaptation of ‘Around the World in Eighty Days’ (2004) with Jackie Chan (I still prefer ‘Around the World with Willy Fog’ – 1983 Japanese/Spanish cartoon successor to ‘Dogtanian and the Three Muskehounds’ – 1981), whilst reading ‘The Earth Turned Upside Down’ (published 1889), it’d be easier if Jules […]

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